October 7, 2016

FENA History

In North America, tractors carried the “Ferguson” badge only from 1948 until 1960. As a result, production numbers for Ferguson tractors are much smaller than those of many other brands, although Ferguson’s development of the 3 point hitch continues to be the standard among many other tractors today. While still supportive of the Massey-Harris and Massey Ferguson kin, there are times when Ferguson owners knew their interests took a back seat or simply got lost in other tractor interest groups where Ferguson is thrown in together with “their red cousins”.

To provide more mutual support, several years ago a small group of dedicated Ferguson buffs agreed to pick a tractor show in the Midwest and bring their tractors and implements. They did this for three or four years, each time adding a few more enthusiasts to the group.

Meeting at the Camp Creek Threshers Show at Waverly, Nebraska in 2001, the group had grown to 21 individuals. There they decided it was time to get organized and agreed to name four from their ranks to serve as a steering committee to form the club, including Clarence Carhill of Mena, AR, Gene Kruse of Lincoln, NE, David Lory of Platteville, WI, and Jim Storment of Mt. Vernon, IL. Paul Nelson, now of Prescott, AZ, volunteered to write a newsletter for the group. To support the newsletter, those present agreed to each kick in $10. Such were the humble beginnings of what has come to be known as Ferguson Enthusiasts of North America (FENA).

Today FENA has over 1000 members in 48 states, seven provinces of Canada, as well as England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Germany, Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway and Australia. It is highly unlikely that any of the original 21 would, in their wildest dreams, have believed that FENA would grow so large, so quickly. FENA is obviously filling a need that has existed for many years.

One of FENA’s goals is to help the Ferguson heritage survive and thrive. It aims to serve not only those who grew up on farms as kids in the 1950’s when the Ferguson name first became well-known and famous, but to reach out to younger enthusiasts, many of whom do not have farm backgrounds, but have developed an affection for all things Ferguson.

Whether young, or simply young at heart; a farmer, or one who just appreciates the farming aspect of our heritage, our members’ enthusiasm for Ferguson tractors continues to grow.