Rear Tire Pressure and Ballast

I have a TO-20 Fergie S/N TO53454, engine No. E153743. Could you verify when it was built? Can you tell me what the tire pressure is supposed to be and, is it necessary to put calcium in the rear wheels? June 27, 2015.

According to the information we have, which is the same serial number information AGCO/MF has published, your tractor was built in 1951, towards the end of TO-20 production. See the attached. http://fergusontractors.org/fena/wp-content/uploads/FerTractorSNs.pdf.

Sadly we have no information about where your tractor was sold or what distributor it was sold to. At that time Ferguson tractors were sold through a network or distributors. The distributors wholesaled Ferguson tractors, implements and parts to their dealers. The distributor network was dissolved shortly after the Massey Harris Ferguson merger. Many of those distributors went out of business as did many Ferguson dealers.

Your only hope might be to locate persons affiliated with the original dealership you believe sold the tractor, if they still exist and can be found and ask if any of their old records exist. The chance of that occurring is highly doubtful as you have already learned.

The tire pressure for the rear tires is 12 lbs. The tire pressure for 4.00 x 19 front tires is 26 lbs.

You will likely find your tractor does just fine without solution in the rear tires. Foregoing the calcium chloride or any other liquid ballast will reduce the chance of the rims corroding because of leaking tire solution.

To preserve the original rims you should dismount the tires, and remove any traces of old calcium chloride by thoroughly washing the rims and neutralizing with a suitable acid solution which could be something as simple as white vinegar. Your local tire dealer may have other suggestions. Then sand blast the rims and apply an acid etch solution to neutralize any rust in the metal before priming with a really good primer for rusty metal.

I’ve had good luck with Rustoleum but there are other products as well. Rustoleum can take a long time to dry completely. Some people have had success with one of the primers that react with rust to form a black primer that is supposed to stop any rust from forming in the future. The finish coat on the outside of the rims should be silver to approximate the original zinc finish.